Sunday, 15 February 2009

Contemporary art in the XXth Century,The Hague,Claude Monet,Tobias Rehberger, Mondriaan, Kandinsky, Constant, Anselm Kiefer,Robert Zandvliet,Ossip



This afternoon i was in The Hague , Gemente Museum has still in exhibition a impressive collection of contemporary art in the XXth Century.

3 Staggering floors of art from artist like Mesdag, Toorop, Van Doesburg, Picasso, Constant, Mondriaan, Lewitt, Merz, L├╝pertz, Baselitz.

Where some pics i took , from what i liked the most.


" Wisteria " - Claude Monet


" Infection 8XWI " - Tobias Rehberger


" Painting Nr 4 " - Piet Mondriaan


" Unbenannte Improvisation " - Wassily Kandinsky


" Vague Terrein " - Constant


" Design for a Gypsy Camp " - Constant


" Wege der Weltweisheit V " - Anselm Kiefer


" Untitled " - Robert Zandvliet

On the musem was also a a replica of Dutch Artits Ossip own studio .

Ossip uses old photographs taken from medical books or faded newspapers and magazines, often dating back to the early twentieth century. He is interested in the images themselves, not their context. The pictures are astonishing, partly because they often show people with physical abnormalities and partly (as when they show classic beauties of the past) because they are removed from their original historical context. Ossip enlarges these isolated images and manipulates them to place them in today’s world. The original image is still there but its meaning is changed. He restores three-dimensionality by stretching strings or wire around it or adding animal bones or fragments of cloth. In this way, emphases are imposed and powerful images are created. Ossip’s procedure conjures up a completely different world, in which viewers are free to endow the new images with whatever significance they choose. Ossip works by association; the texts he places on the works may bear some relationship to them, but then again they may not. His unorthodox working methods are not based on any ideology or art historical style. He aims to avoid any kind of accompanying rhetoric, believing that art should be left to speak for itself. The resulting work is intriguing, often oppressive, challenging and thoroughly thought-provoking.







Bookmark and ShareBookmark and ShareBookmark and Share